The papal touch

He saw the Pope “one glistening January day” in 1870. So that would have been Pius IX. 

"Gorgeously robed sampetrini approached, carrying an august Personage in a sedan-chair. Teedie, conscious of his Dutch Reformed heritage, hissed frantically that “he didn’t believe in popes—that no real American would.” As [his sister] Corinne later recalled:

The Pope … his benign face framed in white hair and the close cap which he wore, caught sight of the group of eager little children craning their necks to see him pass; and he smiled and put out one fragile, delicate hand toward us, and, lo! the late scoffer who, in spite of the ardent Americanism that burned in his eleven-year-old soul, had as much reverence as militant patriotism in his nature, fell upon his knees and kissed the delicate hand, which for a brief moment was laid upon his fair curly hair. 

Source: The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, by Edmund Morris

Mama showed me the portrait of Eidieth [sic] Carow and her face stired [sic] up in me homesickness and longings for the past which will come again never, alack never.

Twelve-year-old Theodore Roosevelt, touring Europe and missing home, and longing for his best friend and future wife, Edith ‘Edie’ Carow. 

From the diary of the man himself as quoted in Edmund Morris’ The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

Can I just say that I absolutely adore the many idiosyncratic spellings of this fabulous human being at the age of twelve? 

Where he was ardent and impulsive, feverish in his enthusiasms, she was sensitive and cautious, a cooling breeze across his sometimes overheated landscape.

– Edmund Morris’ poetic description of the relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and his future wife, young “Edie” Carow!

Teedie began to keep a diary…. Apart from one reference to ‘an attack of the Asmer’ [asthma] on 10 August, the diary reads like that of any normal nine-year-old. Yet Teedie’s health was as bad as ever: he was never well for more than ten days at a time. So accustomed was he, by now, to recurrences of illness that he rarely bothered to record them.

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

by Edmund Morris

At age seven he took the skull of a dead seal and started what he “ambitiously called the ‘Roosevelt Museum of Natural History.’”

Fantastic.

Source: Edmund Morris, Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

Eventually he was forced to explore the most forbidding room in the house: a windowless library, with tables, chairs, and gloomy bookcases. Chancing upon a ponderous edition of David Livingstone’s MISSIONARY TRAVELS AND RESEARCHES IN SOUTHERN AFRICA, Teedie opened it, and found within a world he could happily inhabit the rest of his days.

Edmund Morris

Author, THE RISE OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT

The key to his imagination had been unlocked by a woman to whom the past was more real than the present.

– Edmund Morris, author of THE RISE OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT, writing about “Teedie” as the pupil of his spinster maternal aunt Annie Bulloch, a native of antebellum Georgia
Finally!!!!!!!!! I had to use the Elimination Method even though it wanted me to use Substitution. But for reals…. Substitution wasn’t getting me anywhere, except eating up my paper and dulling my eraser!!!!!!!

Finally!!!!!!!!! I had to use the Elimination Method even though it wanted me to use Substitution. But for reals…. Substitution wasn’t getting me anywhere, except eating up my paper and dulling my eraser!!!!!!!

That last problem on the math homework